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10000 RPM hard-drive & my Netbook
zelda
Greetings!

I'm most interested in the new 320 Gigs 10000RPM hard-drive WD is offering us, but heard a warning all brands install 7200RPM most at laptops this days because the 10K's tend to overheat.

If that's the case -- what would you recommend as a cooling-plate (or whatever name it has) to fit laptops, also outside the box ?

OR is it impossible this days to enjoy this performance on our laps....

I'm still waiting WD tech support answer but would appreciate any remark by any of you out there !

Thanks
Ken in Regina
Hello Zelda,

What benefits are you expecting to get from that 10,000RPM drive? What specific things do you think will get better?

For devices to improve the cooling of your netbook, search for "laptop cooler". That should give you some ideas.

...ken...
mr2
What brand of netbook?
Are you looking to swap out the existing netbook drive or is it an option or is it a external usb drive?
Ken in Regina
Hi mr2,

It wouldn't make any sense for it to be a USB drive because the transfer speed of USB 2.0 is way too slow for it to be any benefit to run a drive that spins faster. The idea behind a faster spinning drive is to increase the speed that data can be transferred from the disk platters. Sticking a USB 2.0 link in front of such a drive would be a waste of money.

That doesn't mean some manufacturer won't do such a silly thing, but it would be a waste of money to buy one.

The reason I asked the original poster what they hope to gain from that 10,000 rpm monster is because it only provides performance benefits under a fairly limited number of situations. It's extremely rare to find anyone doing those kinds of things on an underpowered netbook computer.

...ken...
mr2
Quote:
It wouldn't make any sense for it to be a USB drive because the transfer speed of USB 2.0 is way too slow for it to be any benefit to run a drive that spins faster.
Ken,

Good point! I let that one go right pass me.

The reason I asked what netbook was that a SSD, rather than a platter might be a better chose. SSD may be faster (faster than 5400, although not sure if that is the case with 7200). SSD more costly, but no moving parts, quiet (no fan) and more rugged.
malaki86
I doubt I'd see a big increase in performance in my 17" laptop with a 2.5ghz dual-core amd 64 with 4gig of ram by going to a 10k drive. In a netbook, with an even slower cpu, front-side bus & ram, the performance gain wouldn't be worth the extra money or heat buildup, not to mention that the 10k drive will eat up the battery much faster.
d111
SSDs are quite an unproven technology and in many instances, it may not be faster.

A common 7200rpm drive is your best bet for reliability and trouble free operations.
taoyue
Actually, most laptop hard drives are still 5400 rpm. Netbooks, especially, to cut down on power consumption.

Aside from a few very specific applications, you will generally not see any significant performance benefit from installing a faster-spinning hard drive. Installing more RAM is generally the way to go, especially on Windows Vista and 7, where Superfetch will aggressively prefill the cache from the disk. RAM is so cheap these days that it is the best bang for the buck, by far, compared to upgrading any other part of your system.

Unfortunately, many netbooks make it difficult to add RAM (a few even have the memory soldered-on). Also, most netbooks come with Windows XP, where additional memory will largely be wasted until you actually load an app.

An SSD might be worthwhile in some situations, but even then I'd still buy the RAM before I buy the SSD.
bob332
from somebody who has used 4200, 5400, 7200, 10k, 15k and ssds, yes the ssds are very fast - noticeable even compared to 15k. ssds are also going to use less power, so it is a win/win. if you don't need the space, have 2GB of ram or more then go the ssd.

and ssds are not "unproven" - think military - they have been using it for years. they are just now in the $$$ range we mere mortals can afford them.
Ken in Regina
Hey Bob332,

Welcome to the discussion.

When it comes to that level of performance, it's so easy to mess it up. So, if you are going to get the benefit of raw data transfer rates that 10k RPM or 15k or SSDs might provide, everything between the drive and the CPU has to also be able to take advantage. There's no point in sticking a drive with a huge data transfer rate into a device where the bus speed or memory speed are too slow or the CPU caching is too small.

Manufacturers will do exactly such dumb things: put in a super fast drive for marketing reasons and then cheap out on the mainboard components that are necessary to take advantage of the speed in order to cut the costs.

So the higher the performance claims of any particular component, the more homework we consumers need to do to make sure we will actually get some benefit from it. I have my doubts that any consumer-priced laptop would ever be able to take advantage of high performance in any of the usual components because, overall, there are compromises being made due to form factor (size/shape), battery life and cost.

Caveat emptor.

...ken...
bob332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken in Regina
Hey Bob332,

Welcome to the discussion.

When it comes to that level of performance, it's so easy to mess it up. So, if you are going to get the benefit of raw data transfer rates that 10k RPM or 15k or SSDs might provide, everything between the drive and the CPU has to also be able to take advantage. There's no point in sticking a drive with a huge data transfer rate into a device where the bus speed or memory speed are too slow or the CPU caching is too small.

Manufacturers will do exactly such dumb things: put in a super fast drive for marketing reasons and then cheap out on the mainboard components that are necessary to take advantage of the speed in order to cut the costs.

So the higher the performance claims of any particular component, the more homework we consumers need to do to make sure we will actually get some benefit from it. I have my doubts that any consumer-priced laptop would ever be able to take advantage of high performance in any of the usual components because, overall, there are compromises being made due to form factor (size/shape), battery life and cost.

Caveat emptor.

...ken...
but i would counter that the hdd is by far the slowest item in any pc setup and the latency is much more important than data transfer speed on any computer. it has only been lately that data transfer speeds have actually come close to maxing out a ata100/133/sata150 port, let alone sata300 or 600. in fact, my single drive that has the highest data transfer is a 7200 sata150 drive - it is a 250GB single platter drive, a bit old but that is all i need in that machine. in data transfer it beats out the 15k scsi by a small amount, but the latency is more than twice that of the 15k and thus the computer's overall "snappiness" factor is much less. when we get into ssds, the latency is like nothing, and things happen right after you click the mouse, plus they take nearly no power and in a laptop, to me that is big deal.

imho, i would take a 15k-ssd w/ even a hindered data transfer rate of 50MB/s over a 7200 rpm hdd that had a data transfer rate of 100MB/s strictly because for the most part, loading a program isn't loading large files, and w/ the exception of a few isolated professions, most people aren't moving 100MB-multiple GB files on a normal basis.

fwiw, in testing, i have put 15k scsi setups in old computers setups, like say a old skt 462 xp 2800 w/ 2GB of ram and for day to day stuff, it was = to the same hdd in a 3GHz dual core 4GB rig. obvioiusly when starting modeling or any type of cpu dependant useage the dual core rig would kill the xp 2800 rig. my htpc runs a 30GB ssd w/ win7 currently - before that it ran a 15k scsi drive and the difference is night and day strictly due to the ssds lack of latency. fwiw, the htpc is connected to the home lan and all video is on the home server.

i am however waiting a bit for prices to come down on the current ssds as i need at least 80GB, preferrabley 120GB of so for my laptop - hopefully around christmas time.


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