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Bad NMEA implementation in Microsoft Streets and Trips?
Marvin Hlavac
Quote:
Originally Posted by centrix5
Those are correct NMEA Sequence. SeaClear and GeoNav and even Franson GPS Gate can recognize it and can plot the coordinates accurately. Microsoft Street cant read it.
Hi centrix5, and welcome to the forum. What GPS receiver is it? Does it have a name and model written on it? Approximately how old is the unit?
centrix5
I'm using the Sperry IBS System. it has GPS NMEA 183, Wind Data 183 and Gyro Data NMEA 183.
longjohn119
An Integrated Bridge System for car navigation?

What are you driving, an amphibious assault vehicle or something?

NV is just a proprietary prefix like Garmin using PG or Magellan and Motorola using PM prefixes. the last 3 letters are the actual GPS data prefix. Most programs will convert, it's not a big deal code wise but obviously Microsoft didn't bother to include that code
centrix5
Do you think there is a program that can convert it to a recognizable format for Microsoft?
Ken in Regina
Which of the three protocols is it currently set to? Will setting it to GPS NMEA 183 do the $GP prefixes instead of the NV prefixes?

...ken...
centrix5
Yeah, something like that will do.
jorget
Just got a cheap Chinese GPS USB dongle. It worked out of the box with pretty much every other piece of software; not so with MS Streets&Trips 2010 trial version. Same message until...

I got Franson GPSGate version 2.6

I configure output to a virtual COM5 port (different from COM15 when I plug the dongle in a USB port). Right after that Street&Trips recognize my GPS dongle right away

The question here is:

Is it worth the 45 CDN dollars for the MS S&T 2010?
+ 39 US dollars for Franson GPSGate?
+ 15 CDN dollars for the GPS USB dongle?

I guess I will give it a try for the next 14 days

Results to follow...
jorget
Forgot to mention

Running in HP Windows 7 laptop

Will be also testing in XP SP3 32 bit

Finally, I will try the Xport software with XP laptop
tcassidy
There is a version of GPS Gate Express for around US $13 that will do the job and xport should work too. However, what you have learned is S&T is fussy about its GPS and the cheapest approach is to buy it with a GPS.

Terry
Ken in Regina
Well, it's not really fussy about its GPS. It will work just fine with any GPS receiver that outputs standard NMEA data.

The problem is that it is absolutely limited to one single setting to receive the data from the GPS. It will only receive data through a COM port and it must be set to 4800 bps. This is still astonishing to me in 2010, soon 2011, that Microsoft can't do better than that.

...ken...
tcassidy
You can certainly look at it that way but it doesn't help in the short term. The best idea is buy a GPS that matches the software you want to use. Rather than buy a GPS and hope it works with the software you want to try.

Terry
Ken in Regina
Not universally good advice. It's advice I support completely if someone is looking at Streets&Trips because the bundled receiver is pretty decent. And the communications options are so limited.

But it's not something I would push for someone looking at DeLorme Street Atlas. First, the LT-40 that comes bundled with Street Atlas isn't very impressive. Second, Street Atlas has modern communication options so it will work, easily, with any GPS receiver. That's really the way it should be.

...ken...
tcassidy
I am certainly not a fan of the LT-40 mainly because it only works with Delorme. However, as I have said before, I think GPS designers selling to the American market should support 4800 bps. There is nothing inherently better that 9600 bps or higher provides. Just a slight difference of veiwpoint and not negating Microsoft's lack of forward thinking.

Terry
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