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What are the iWAGB & iWAGT optional items selling with GlobalSat GPS receivers?
OneRVer
Would someone please explain to me what are " iWAG-T" and "iWAG-B", and is it worth paying a little more for either one? Thank you.
tcassidy
They appear to be something to attach to your i Whatever.

Terry
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Ken in Regina
As Terry said, do you have an iWhatever (pod/pad/phone/touch) that you want to connect a GPS to? If not, the extras are not of any interest to you.

...ken...
OneRVer
Nope, just a lap top, trying to learn this gps stuff.

May I also ask, why would you need to have a 5 hz switch and what is the difference between MTK-II chip set and the SiRF III GPS chipset?
Marvin Hlavac
Most consumer GPS receivers have their update frequency set to 1 Hz (one update per second). That is sufficient for driving a car, and most consumer GPS software applications are not even able to take advantage of higher refresh rates.

However, some programs (such as Garmin Mobile PC) will actually refresh the map on the screen of your laptop more frequently if a GPS receiver supplies the data more frequently. This may result in a smoother map movement on the screen. Some people like it, some don't, and I'm indifferent.
OneRVer
Well I have been reading for two days now and my eyes have had it. I have been trying to decide which Blue Tooth gps receiver to buy. The BT-Q818XT or the BT-368i.

Both are impressive units. The BT-Q818XT has excellent battery life.

However, I have decided to do what you all have suggested and go with the BU-353. I won't have the freedom with this unit compared to a blue tooth but will it really make that much difference.
Ken in Regina
Quote:
Originally Posted by OneRVer
However, I have decided to do what you all have suggested and go with the BU-353. I won't have the freedom with this unit compared to a blue tooth but will it really make that much difference.
Not really, unless you are likely to mount your laptop/netbook in a location that is a long ways from the windshield, e.g. farther away than the length of the USB cable.

The upside of a USB receiver is that it is zero maintenance. When I'm not using it, it just sits there quietly collecting dust until I'm ready to use it again. I need to try to remember to recharge my two Bluetooth receivers periodically or they may be discharged when I'm ready to use them next.

An advantage of the BU353 is that it's weatherproof and has a magnetic base so you can stick it on the outside of the vehicle if you are going to be spending some time in difficult reception conditions.

As Marvin said, for most of us who just want automobile navigation, the difference in the refresh frequency (1Hz vs. 5Hz) isn't really relevant. Nor is the difference between the SirfStarIII vs the MTK chips significant. For practical purposes, they work perfectly in normal conditions and acceptably in difficult conditions.

...ken...
tcassidy
The advantage of the MTKII chip is in cold start performance. It is probably 3 times as fast as the SirfStar III. Fortunately the BU-353 can maintain the GPS almanac even when unplugged so you rarely run into a cold start situation.

I have a UMPC with an internal SirfStar III chip which doesn't appear to maintain any power when not selected. That means I have to wait 3 minutes on average for it to find a satellite, download an almanac and gather some reasonable data. Needless to say, I never use it!

The MTKII is more sensitive but that can be a bad thing as well. Marvin tested the BU-353 against a GM2 (MTKII) in an crowded metropolitan area and, generally, the BU-353 was better able to deal with the signals reflecting off buildings (multipath). Possibly in dense undergrowth while navigating off road, the MTKII would best the SirfStar III.

SirfStar III technology has been around for a while and is a well refined, solid product.

Terry
OneRVer
Not sure how I found this site, but, I sure am glad I did.
tcassidy
If you are interested in the MTKII chip, consider the iBlue GM2 USB GPS. It is also waterproof and magnetic and with a longer cord than the BU-353. Just make sure to read our review to be aware of some of the shortcomings and how to overcome them. We provide the proper software version required to modify the device for use with many Navigation programs.

http://www.laptopgpsworld.com/3933-i-blue-gm-2-usb-gps-receiver

Terry
OneRVer
I am not sure what I want when it come to the chip.

Right now I am using the bluetooth receiver that came with CoPilot Laptop 10. Not sure of the make, just says CoPilot Bluetooth GPS on it.

I have had lag time problems with either the version 10 or this bluetooth, meaning the turn is about 1,000 feet after the turn. So the trust is not there.

So when I order the version 8 laptop I want to start it up with a new receiver.

I am just waiting to see the new Laptop Truck version coming out this week before I make the order.

I'm sure the Truck version is more than what I need but what the heck. I like bells and whistles.
tcassidy
The only review I have seen of a Copilot Bluetooth GPS lists it as a SirfStar IIe but that was 2003; the SirfStar III is a vastly superior chipset. However, lag problems are usually a function of the program or computer, not the GPS. The way to find out would be to try a different GPS with your program though.

Terry
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