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Garmin GLO Bluetooth GLONASS receiver
tcassidy
I got GPS Gate working on the q550 by uninstalling/ reinstalling. It did not help S&T but nRoute works fine topping at 50% cpu.

Terry
Attached Images
glo-nroute-via-gps-gate.jpg  
tcassidy
I thought I would try GMPC via GPS Gate but ran into an unusual situation. Although GPS Gate was running and connected to the GLO using Bluetooth, GMPC came up still connected to the Bluetooth COM port. Both are showing a solid signal. In case it is not clear from the screenshot GPS Gate is only putting out a signal on COM 1 (Garmin) and COM 2. GMPC is connected to COM 3.

Maybe this GPS can be connect to more than one device via Bluetooth.

Terry
Attached Images
2-feeds.jpg  
tcassidy
Oops, ignore that. I forgot to turn off the iTrek!!

Terry
tcassidy
I tried pairing the GLO with Win 8 and was successful with one caveat; you must supply a passcode. This was the same requirement for XP but not Win 7. Like all Garmin Bluetooth GPS devices, it is 1234.

Win 8 does not let you know the COM ports created but S&T 2013, CoPilot Live Laptop v8 and Delorme Street Atlas 2011 were able to find it automatically.

Terry
Attached Images
glo-code.jpg  
tcassidy
If you need to know the COM port the BT stack provides for the GLO, click on the Bluetooth icon in the notification area of the desktop. Choose 'Open Settings' and the 'COM Ports' tab. Look for the Outgoing COM port listed for the Garmin GLO #xxxxx 'COM5'
Attached Images
win-8-glo-com-ports.jpg  
tcassidy
I tried the GLO with GPSView v1.2.18 both without and with GPS Gate. It appears that GPS Gate does not change the refresh rate. I had tried GPS Info which crashed and burned when set to 4800 probably because of the data overload. Unfortunately it doesn't seem to see GPS Gate virtual COM ports. Neither program sees GLONASS satellites. I haven't found one that does.

Terry
Attached Images
glo-gpsview.jpg  
Boyd
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcassidy
Neither program sees GLONASS satellites. I haven't found one that does.
Neither have I. Just tried Visual GPS, but it won't do it either: http://www.visualgps.net/visualgps/
tcassidy
I tested the GLO with S&T 2013 on a more powerful computer today. While it appears to work when the whole thing doesn't crash, it is not even close as far as tracking the actual position. The GLO worked fine with CoPilot Live Laptop v8 though.

Terry
Attached Images
glo-s-t-win8.jpg   glo-copilot-win8.jpg  
Boyd
One of the complaints about the GLO in various user reviews I've seen is that it can accidentally be turned on too easily. I would have to agree; I think Garmin sort of has this backwards. You have to hold the button down for several seconds to turn it off - which is fine. They should also require you to hold the button down several seconds to turn it on.

I wonder if Garmin has provided a method to update the firmware somehow? I guess it would have to be done via Bluetooth since the USB outlet is only for power.
tcassidy
I agree about the turning on part. The 10x requires about 3 seconds press to turn on and the same for off. This one turns on instantly.

It took me a few tries to figure out how to turn it off as the light goes orange and I thought I had to push it longer.

The blue light going solid for connection is easier to recognize than the one on the 10x though. That one goes from moderately fast flash (1 second)to slow flash (5 seconds) on connection.The green light is only used for charging indication on the 10x whereas it shows satellite lock on the GLO.

Or maybe lack of lights saves battery on the 10x!

Terry
tcassidy
Boyd, I'll be interested when you check your property marks with the GLO. I have 3 computers running GMPC with the sensors within inches of each other. The 10x and iTrek are close to agreeing on the location while the GLO is quite different.

Terry
Attached Images
itrek-gmpcs-win-7.jpg   10x-gmpch-win-8.jpg   glo-gmpc-xp.jpg  
tcassidy
Ignore that. That copy of GMPC was set for Dutch Datum...why I don't know. Setting to WGS84 put it right. I am getting sloppy!


Terry
Attached Images
wg84.jpg  
Boyd
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcassidy
Boyd, I'll be interested when you check your property marks with the GLO.
I would expect the results to be pretty similar to the comparisons I posted on page 3 of this thread.

Regarding the LED's... why do they have to be so bright and annoying? It's not usable on the dashboard for night driving with those lights reflecting in the windshield. I'm using it on the mat sitting on the armrest now though, which is fine. And you'd think that they must have some effect on battery life (although probably not major).

That is really my only criticism of the GLO. I found it very confusing trying to understand what the different patterns of flashing lights meant at first. It would be nice if Garmin gave us a little app of some sort that shows the status of the GLO, like the current battery charge, accuracy and a full list of the satellites.
Ken in Regina
Interesting discussion, guys.

Just a couple of things to add.

@Boyd, it bears repeating something Terry said earlier. The increased refresh rate has absolutely no bearing on the accuracy of the GPS receiver. All it does is send the results out to the receiving device/program more frequently.

That is, the accuracy is there whether the refresh rate is 1Hz or 10Hz.

The only thing the higher refresh rate allows is finer display precision on a moving map display by the receiving device/program. This is really only relevant if you are travelling at relatively high speed. And assumes the receiving device has the horsepower to manage it.

Which leads to the high CPU/GPU usage you guys are seeing. It takes a lot more horsepower to calculate and redraw a moving map at relatively high resolution when you have to do it 10 times (a full order of magnitude) more frequently, eg. 10Hz vs. 1Hz.

Second thing is related to GMPC behaviour with Garmin devices. I'm not sure of all the details of ProITM's patches but one common fix in all of his versions was to bypass GMPC's code to check the device ID against an internal list of "acceptable" devices.

For some strange reason Garmin saw fit to include a list of Garmin devices that it had tested with GMPC. The list was generated way back when they were still doing Alpha/Beta testing and was never updated. GMPC checks the Garmin device ID against the internal list and if it's not in the internal list it declares it incompatible and refuses to use it. It will, however, cheerfully use any generic, non-Garmin, NMEA device you care to attach. The check against the internal list only applies to Garmin devices.

This is only an issue with the software-only version of GMPC. The hardware version is, of course, married permanently to the device it shipped with.

Garmin finally update the internal list in .70 to include a bunch more models. But they never removed the list and the check against it, as many of us requested.

So, you are better off to use the ProITM version of .60 of the software-only version. That way you avoid the internal check when using a Garmin device that is newer than the internal list (nearly all of them!!!) and you avoid the bugs that Garmin introduced into .70.

...ken...
Boyd
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken in Regina
@Boyd, it bears repeating something Terry said earlier. The increased refresh rate has absolutely no bearing on the accuracy of the GPS receiver. All it does is send the results out to the receiving device/program more frequently.
Ken, I understand that the accuracy "is what it is" if you look at any individual fix that the device sends out. However, we all know that waypoint averaging can give much more accurate results than a single position fix.

My 60csx takes one reading per second when using waypoint averaging. So if you let the GPS sit stationary for a half hour it would have 30 x 60 = 1800 samples to average. I could collect the same amount of data in only 3 minutes with the GLO. Seems like that would help (or at least it couldn't hurt).

FWIW, I am not seeing any issues using the GLO "right out of the box" with GMPC although Terry has had some issues with hardware that's slower than mine. And it even works fine with nRoute (via GPSGate) which is ancient. My only real problem was Streets and Trips 2009. So it must have something to do with how the various programs read their data. Like, maybe some of them only actually look at the data stream once per second, regardless of what the driver can supply?
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