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Don't even waste your time with the demo of Mapfactor Navigator 11
GoneNomad
I recently downloaded the latest version of Mapfactor Navigator 11 and installed it as a trial. The full version with a US map costs €101 (Euros) which is about $127.

Here's an interesting tidbit about this: mapfactor Navigator 11 is available in two languages: Czech and English, and the 'order checkout' where you enter your address has these fields in this order: Street/City/Postcode/Country. Those are a warning signs for US buyers.

Short of going to the trouble of doing screen captures and posting them here, let me just cut to the chase: Don't even waste your time with the demo. IMO it isn't worth trying to use Navigator 11 even if it was free!
Marvin Hlavac
What specifically did you not like about version 11?
GoneNomad
The Navigator 11 interface is probably one of the worst I've kludges I've seen so far. (If I get time sometime I will grab some screen captures and post them, but at this point that would be throwing away good time after bad) And it's non-native-English roots are lurking everywhere.

You can download a free version that uses OSM (which don't affect the interface) here:
http://navigatorfree.mapfactor.com/en/

I didn't try actually navigating with it. I know it did not find the attached GPS receiver (the one that comes with S&T) that even CoPilot 10 did (even though ALK doesn't "support" that one),

Who knows? Maybe Navigator 11 has the best navigational functionality ever?! Considering the other clues, I seriously doubt that. If anyone else wants to try it, please let us know.

After spending (or wasting) almost a solid week wading through all the different alternatives, I'm learning to cut my lost time early on by setting my POS alarm to "early warning" mode. And as I mentioned elsewhere, it all led full circle back to S&T, warts and all.
GoneNomad
Here are a few screen captures from Navigator 11. No matter what "mode" you are in, every screen is full screen, and usually leads to another and another and another. The first one below shows the main "map" screen, on which there are only a few tools (at the top; but only if you click on the map first). Clicking on the car icon button (Routing) at lower right brings up the screen in the 2nd image below, which leads to the 3rd image, and... you get the idea. The 4th and 5th images below are the first two screens you encounter (in sequence) when trying to search for something, I never did make it through however many screens might be required to enter an address to search on, which in any NORMAL Windows (or Mac, or Ubuntu, or whatever) program I could simple type OR paste into ONE box.

And this is what you can buy for $127? Trust me, don't waste time with the demo, just PASS on Mapfactor Navigator 11.
Attached Images
navigator-11-screen-cap-1.jpg   navigator-11-screen-cap-2.jpg   navigator-11-screen-cap-3.jpg   navigator-11-screen-cap-4.jpg   navigator-11-screen-cap-5.jpg  

tcassidy
Many programs expect you to go through more than one screen to enter an address. The ones that don't are sometimes very fussy about the information you do enter. Hardly a good enough reason to bypass looking at this, especially if there is a free trial!

Terry
GoneNomad
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcassidy
Many programs expect you to go through more than one screen to enter an address. The ones that don't are sometimes very fussy about the information you do enter. Hardly a good enough reason to bypass looking at this, especially if there is a free trial!
Terry
...hmmmm, not any program that complies with Windows standard guidelines that I know of. But most of these nav programs don't. Instead their publishers decided to mimic typical standalone Nav unit interface. Nice on a handheld device, but a huge handicap on a real computer.

It's not just a matter of how many screens, but also how they've chosen to arrange them, and the fact that they're all full-screen, and a lot of other stuff I don't have time to go into. Like I said, after spending (or wasting) almost a solid week wading through all the different alternatives, I'm learning to cut my lost time.

I think it actually is a free version using OSM maps, so maybe it doesn't have a trial period. My two cents worth is I would not waste any more of my time on it. But, have at it if you have some time to kill. Like I said, maybe the navigational instructions are better then the rest of it looks so far.
tcassidy
Maybe I haven't been reading your plethora of posts clearly enough and forgive me if that is the case. But exactly what Windows guidelines are you speaking of?

Companies design products the way they do because that is what people will pay money for, not only out of some internal confusion.

Terry
GoneNomad
Look at any mainstream Windows program, and you'll see compliance with the interface and interoperability guidelines, for example in tasks such as Open, Save, Copy, Paste, dialog boxes, menus, shortcuts, and lots of other things involving look, feel, and functionality. It makes it easier for users of one program to use other programs. It's not only Microsoft that does that, but also Adobe, and many other smaller companies that made mainstream software before they were bought out by bigger companies. Apple has even more extensive guidelines for MacOS programs.

Interface guidelines are helpful in avoiding the software equivalents of these:



And here's the topper... but since it isn't obvious in the picture, I should note that this beauty used an iPod-like wheel you rotated to dial numbers, text message, and navigate the user interface:
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