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Any current Nav software able to use 5Hz GPS data?
GoneNomad
I understand that having only one GPS position update per second is not a huge disadvantage for normal automotive navigation. However, it sure seems to me that twice per second would be helpful, even if five per second might be overkill for a vehicle moving at 110 feet per second on the highway.

I noticed that USGlobalsat now has 5Hz versions of their SiRF Star IV GPS receivers. Also the Dual XGPS150 has been updated to provide GPS data at 5Hz.

I read through some of the previous threads about whether or not different Windows programs or Android apps can utilize 5Hz GPS data, but I'm not sure what the current situation may be because those threads are several years old.

Although one post indicated that S&T can use more than 1 position update per second, (but not if the data is going through GPSGate), more posts here and elsewhere indicate that S&T is limited to 1 position update per second, mainly due to the fixed 4800 baud rate.

The BU-353S4-5Hz specs indicate that it supports a baud rate of 115200. That is 12 times higher than the larger of the two choices (9600) available in the USGlobalSat bundled GPSinfo program, so I don't know how 115200 correlates to 4800/9600... Maybe they aren't directly related to the GPS data refresh rate? Is a higher baud rate than 4800 *required* to accomplish 5 GPS position updates per second?

The bottom line is, I wonder if ANY automotive-type nav app currently usable (even if discontinued like S&T) on Windows 10 or Android can actually utilize more than one GPS position update per second.

If anybody has a pretty good idea about this, I'd appreciate it if you'd take the time to share what you know with me.
tcassidy
All Windows navigation programs except S&T that I have tried can use higher data rates. GMPC, CoPilot, Delorme all work with 5 and 10 Hz refresh rates. I do know GMPC tops out at 57600 bps but that is enough for 10 Hz rates. And yes...the data contained in a NMEA sentence at 5 updates per second exceeds the space available at 4800 bps.

Terry
GoneNomad
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcassidy
All Windows navigation programs except S&T that I have tried can use higher data rates. GMPC, CoPilot, Delorme all work with 5 and 10 Hz refresh rates. I do know GMPC tops out at 57600 bps but that is enough for 10 Hz rates. And yes...the data contained in a NMEA sentence at 5 updates per second exceeds the space available at 4800 bps.

Terry
Thanks!

I assumed that the "baud rate" put a constraint on the data refresh rate but I wasn't sure how limiting 4800 was.

I tried my BU-353S4 (1Hz version) for the first time yesterday, with both an old Toshiba Thrive Android tablet and Win7 laptop, and the GPS performance was drastically better than the Thrive's internal GPS (but then again, my new LG GPad is also drastically better than the Thrive).

FWIW, I had not tried to use S&T in a long time, and I almost forgot how useful some of the features are, which are currently not available on any Android/iOS nav app. But I also forgot how clunky and cumbersome it is to do some basic things in S&T in comparison.

Since Street Atlas accepts 5Hz GPS data, maybe it's time to take another look at SA (despite the interface being even more complicated than S&T) for long trip planning, because there's NOTHING on Android or iOS that will do some of the things S&T and SA do. The Android app "Roadtrippers" (a trip planning front end that hands off the actual nav to google maps/nav) shows what COULD be, but it's optimized for local trips (service, delivery, etc.) rather than long touring trips, and even the paid version has some serious limitations that S&T never had (e.g.: max 500 waypoints routed per day... every time you recalculate a route, the total number of waypoints in the route is deducted from that limit).
Boyd
With MobilePC, the difference in response was quite noticeable when using my Garmin GLO (10 updates/sec) as opposed to the Navation uBlox USB receiver. In track up mode the map would rotate very smoothly instead of jumping.

Using the GLO in OruxMaps and other software under Android also showed much smoother rotation and scrolling as opposed the the Galaxy tablet's internal GPS.

Same thing with Galileo and StreetPilot on my iPhone. I did some testing awhile ago with recorded track points from the GLO in Galileo. I found that it recorded an average of 6 positions per second. Now, iOS automatically switches between the internal chip and an external receiver based on what it considers their accuracy and there is no indication of what's going on "under the hood". So that might be why I wasn't seen 10 points per second in the track logs.
GoneNomad
Thanks Boyd.

Every time I've tried Delorme SA in the past, I come to the same conclusion: too cumbersome. And that's still true. It had been a while since I'd tried to use S&T, but after spending way too long investigating the possible S&T alternatives available for Android (mostly "trip planning" apps that turn out be more about storing reservations & other trip info than planning a road trip), I have to say that it's a sad situation that the people who need the functionality that S&T provided (even though S&T needed a complete UI overhaul about a decade ago) are left with practically no alternative.
cmgrant
I know this thread has been asleep for about a month, but I just recently joined the forum. In the last few days I have been working on a GPS proxy to route data from my new high rate Garmin GLO to S&T, which is limited to data at 4800 baud. With some VB magic and software to make virtual com ports I have been able to consolidate and route only the most basic data to S&T that allows it to function. It seems I can get 2 or possibly 3 updates per second (at 4800 baud) by stripping and consolidating NMEA sentences from the GLO.
Ken in Regina
Neat trick!

...ken...
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