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Chromebooks and GPS Software
SnoBear
It appears that several Asus Chromebooks can now run Android Apps from the Google Play Store. I'm wondering if anyone has tried this setup with such GPS software as Back Country Navigator or Gaia?

I have BCN on my phone, but the screen isn't large enough to read while bouncing around in the Jeep. I currently use Delorme's Topo map product on a small Windows laptop, but the future of that product is in doubt and the maps are quite dated.

Looking for options ...

Thanks
Brad
Boyd
I tried to start a discussion on this awhile ago but there wasn't much interest. Maybe there's more info available now? http://www.laptopgpsworld.com/5632-android-apps-coming-google-chromebooks
Ken in Regina
The issue is likely whether anyone here has a Chromebook to try the stuff.

In my case, if i wanted Android apps on a bigger screen I would be more inclined to get an Android tablet with an 8" to 10" screen (I have a Nexus 9). You can likely get an inexpensive Android tablet for as little as a good Chromebook. It will be easier to mount because you won't have the keyboard to deal with. It will probably have fewer compatibility issues. And it will have a GPS built in.

I use ALK Copilot on my Nexus 5 phone and Nexus 9 tablet. I have also messed with ORUXmaps on the tablet.

...ken...
Boyd
My 11" MacBook Air gives me all the portability I need and it's a real computer with an i7 CPU, 8GB RAM and 512GB SSD. I don't want something that's completely dependent on an internet connection and Google's servers. And I already have an 8" Samsung Android tablet.

Quote:
It will be easier to mount because you won't have the keyboard to deal with. It will probably have fewer compatibility issues. And it will have a GPS built in.
Pretty good summary of why almost nobody uses a "Laptop GPS" anymore.
Ken in Regina
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyd
My 11" MacBook Air gives me all the portability I need and it's a real computer with an i7 CPU, 8GB RAM and 512GB SSD. I don't want something that's completely dependent on an internet connection and Google's servers. And I already have an 8" Samsung Android tablet.
Yes, that's why a Chromebook hasn't been of any particular interest to me.

Interestingly, I've just discovered that that's pretty much the same reason I'm not interested in one of the Windows 2-in-1 (or "convertible) devices. I had a Microsoft Surface Pro (1st generation). My daughter has decided to return to university to add an Education degree to her CV so she can go be a teacher... something she's wanted to be since she was a kid. She needed a portable Windows device so I gave her the Surface Pro.

It wasn't entirely her dad being generous and helpful. Obviously it gave me a good excuse to replace it with a new toy!

Costco had a couple of nice bundles on at the time (about 3 weeks ago). The first one I tried was the Surface Pro 4. I tried it for a couple of days and took it back. It had a couple of minor but pesky irritants and I figured for that kind of money I should not have to put up with any irritants.

When I took the Surface Pro 4 back I picked up an Acer Aspire Switch Alpha 12 bundle to try out. I discovered that it also had some irritants that I didn't want to live with so I took it back, too.

Then I thought about what was really going on and realized it had nothing to do with the irritants. It had almost entirely to do with the fact that I neither need nor want a portable Windows device.

Much like your reasoning regarding your "real" laptop computer, I have two serious Windows desktop computers for when I want to do Windows stuff. For portable stuff I have an Android phone and an Android tablet. I find them completely sufficient for those times when I want a portable device.

When I'm out and about I just want a phone that fits in my pocket but lets me still do email, browse and run some other useful apps, including ALK CoPilot for occasional navigation chores. I have a Nexus 5 for that.

When I'm sitting at home over breakfast or watching TV in the evening I want something with a larger screen but it doesn't need to do anything more than my phone does. My Nexus 9 with its 9" screen works fine for that. So, no need nor desire for a portable Windows device. But that's strictly personal.

I think for the person who wants or needs a portable Windows device, the 2-in-1 convertibles, like the two I tried out above, are going to be the way to go. Their only shortcoming is that, like laptops, you need an external GPS for most of them. That's a shame because they are otherwise perfectly suited for vehicle navigation purposes like we're discussing.

...ken...
Marvin Hlavac
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyd

Pretty good summary of why almost nobody uses a "Laptop GPS" anymore.
I still do!

Every single day I do!

However, I only do it because I still have my Garmin Mobile PC with lifetime map update. When the software stops working one day, that will be the day I will have to think of a different way of navigating. For now though, NOTHING beats GPS navigation done on my laptop. NOTHING!

Ken in Regina
If anyone ever gets around to developing something as competent for navigation as Streets&Trips or Mobile PC or CoPilot or even Street Atlas for the "tablet" side of Windows 10 (eg. a universal app) I'll likely get another portable Windows device but right now there's no reason to.

Unfortunately I got the software version of Mobile PC so there's no way I can get it to work now. Mobile PC is the very best out there for those lucky enough to still have it working.

...ken...


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