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The new Sygic GPS Navigation & Maps is worth checking out!
GoneNomad
Here's something else you might want to try out:
Sygic GPS Navigation & Maps

I evaluated this several years ago, and at the time it was an outright POS, even if overlooking the euro-centric terminology it used.

But Sygic GPS Navigation & Maps has improved dramatically, and it's now a very viable contender in the top tier with the others that Ken & I compared last November (Sygic wasn't even considered at that time).

Sygic is also available in RV & truck versions.

Apparently Sygic GPS Navigation & Maps is available on Windows
platform, but I'm not sure if it's only for Windows Phone??? Hopefully somebody with a Win10 laptop can check that.

It's based on TomTom's maps, but the scheme for downloading & using individual states works better than TomTom.

IMO the UI is easier/better than TomTom's app, and the long-term price is a lot lower than TomTom's subscription model too: retail cost for Lifetime Premium: 20€; Lifetime Premium + Traffic: 30€ (even less when on sale).

But using TomTom's maps also appears to create most of the same flaws that made TomTom one of the losers in our comparison, such as being blind/stupid about finding the actual main entrance roads for major shopping centers (as well as the infamous rest area/welcome center in Paducah, KY), even after successfully routing to the general proximity of it.

I ran a couple of quick longer trip routing tests, and Sygic's did OK on trips two 100 mile trips, but its long distance (~1000 mi) routing is as bad as TomTom, and fixing that by adding via points isn't so easy either. Although Sygic allows waypoints to be manually added, you have to pick them from a list, by their address, without being able to see them on a map until afterwards, in a zoomed in view that doesn't show the position relative to the route untill you manually zoom out (usually a lot). Adding waypoints in CoPilot 10.2 is vastly easier & better.

Yesterday, I ran through a few quick tests similar to those we did last November, and the Win10 Maps app still beats the others in that respect, including the Google Maps/Nav app.

More extensive tests will have to wait, since real-life work has priority right now.

But I encourage anyone who has the time to check out Sygic GPS Navigation & Maps, especially if there is a Win10 version.
tcassidy
Windows store says it is available for PCs.

Terry
Attached Images
sygic.jpg  
GoneNomad
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcassidy
Windows store says it is available for PCs.

Terry
Thanks for confirming that.

My confusion stemmed from the Sygic website only listing it for phone, and the first time I tried to find it on the Windows store, all the language was Slovakian or whatever.
tcassidy
Not much in the way of addresses but it did have the ferry I usually use. 6 days to test but I don't like the address set up so I'll pass. Sorry. Not sure what the conversion rate from Euros to Canadian dollars but I'd guess around C$30 for the premium service.

Terry
Attached Images
sygic-map.jpg  
GoneNomad
My brief testing also showed it has trouble finding named places, or POIs.
Map data files are pretty small, so I'm wondering if it needs a network connection to find POIs, but I didn't test it with Wi-Fi off.

Still looks like CoPilot is the better value, or will be for Windows when the version 10.x comes out. Until then, Win10 Maps is probably better than Sygic.

What is it you 'don't like the address set up' ?
tcassidy
It is a one line entry with no clear indication of what format is required. The one address I found in Vancouver required the street address, city and province from what I could determine...and then only found the block! It couldn't find the addresses I tried in Surrey or White Rock BC. Hell, it couldn't even find White Rock.

I do have CoPilot on my Win 10 tablet but it searches by city first...a method I don't care for. And doesn't even know about the Duke Point ferry. These are important to me.

Terry
GoneNomad
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcassidy
It is a one line entry with no clear indication of what format is required. The one address I found in Vancouver required the street address, city and province from what I could determine...and then only found the block! It couldn't find the addresses...
Yeah, that's similar to what I noticed, which in my case manifested as not being able to find places. And when I tried using the 'find place' approach, that didn't work so well either.

Initially, when I had just the Missouri state map loaded, a search for "Sams Club Crestwood, MO" resulted in the intended result at the top of a very short list. After I loaded quite a few other state maps so I could test much longer routes, the exact same search resulted in a looong list of other places beginning with Sams (and adding the apostrophe "Sam's..." did not help), and it could not find the intended Sams Club even if I told it the street name it was on, which kind of defeats the purpose if you're in an unfamiliar area, and looking for a certain POI. Just to be sure, I removed all other states except Missouri, and sure enough, it was able to find the Crestwood Sam's Club just from those three key words.


Quote:
Originally Posted by tcassidy
I do have CoPilot on my Win 10 tablet but it searches by city first...a method I don't care for. And doesn't even know about the Duke Point ferry. These are important to me.
The new version of CoPilot (10.x) handles that better. It allows searching nearby, at the destination, or near a city you designate.

Some of the features in the new version of CoPilot (10.x)are kind of hidden. They may have gone a bit too far in de-cluttering the UI. I didn't like it at first until I eventually stumbled onto some of the features I thought they had removed (compared to v9.x). It doesn't help that CoPilot releases new software without a comprehensive user guide/tutorial, but they're hardly the only one that does that.
tcassidy
The only positive about CoPilot v9 for Win 7/8/10 (the cheap version) that I could see is it will work with a location sensor or a GPS. I couldn't seem to get it to see GPSDirect on my S3 so installed it on my Asus VTN8 which has a location sensor. As so few if any Win 10 laptops/ tablets have location sensors, its not much of an advantage though.

Terry
GoneNomad
OK, I spent a little more time with Sygic GPS Navigation & Maps befire I un-installed it.

Deal-breaking flaws:

Like TomTom MyDrive, Sygic's long-distance routing is not very good. Sygic is also very slow to calculate them, and had a tendency of locking up altogether.

It took Sygic 45 seconds to calculate two routes to Oregon from St. Louis (~ 1,700 miles), and neither of them were the correct one. CoPilot takes about 5 seconds to come up with three routes, with the default route being the correct one.

The first of the two Sygic routes is displayed in about 15 seconds but it's actually still working on it, and the second one finally finishes about 30 seconds later. There's a progress bar indicator at the top while it's doing this, but it cycles over and over so you're never really sure if it's done or not. Then when it IS done, it fairly quickly automatically starts a navigation using the default route (and I couldn't find any preference setting to turn that off either), which in this case was the worse of the two routes it came up with. The better route was "almost" the correct one except it omitted a key shortcut, which added 48 miles to the trip. The default route was about the same distance, but over more difficult (steeper & curvier) terrain in Colorado.

While none of the apps always come up with the correct route as a default, adding to the problem in Sygic's case is that it's not possible to manually reroute by dragging or choosing a point on a map. Sygic allows this only by entering a place or an address, which are shown in a list and you cannot see them on a map before adding them to the route. On my 1,700 mile test route, the first time I tried adding a waypoint that way, it started doing that lengthy recalculation again and then eventually I got the "Sygic has stopped responding, do you want to close it?" message. The second time it worked but only after a recalculation that was almost as bad as the initial one.

As far as I'm concerned, this is enough to avoid Sygic for long distance travel. The slowness alone makes it impractical for long distance travel, on top of not being easily able to reroute while in the map view.

But there are a few other problems too, as noted above.
Let me add another one: although the UI is generally very good, the map view used for trip planning has no zoom buttons (even though if the preference to have "zoom buttons" is enabled, that only works when in the navigation mode). While the multi-finger pinch-zoom works pretty well in most case, in this case it's way too easy to also change the map orientation, when all you wanted to do is zoom, resulting in a spinning map display that you have to realign, far too often. The only way around this is double-tapping to zoom in, but there's no similar way to zoom out.

Also, the indicators for next turn and lane assist are pretty small, as is the type in the road name "sign" at the top (even though there's lots of blank space to make them larger. All of these are a smaller and harder to read than their counterparts in CoPilot, which also has junction view, which Sygic lacks.

So my initial optimism was once again premature.
Although Sygic is not really a POS anymore, it's not really a contender either.

IMO, CoPilot is the leader cross-platform, while Win10Maps is the leader on Windows, unless CoPilot's extra vehicle types are needed.
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