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I feel technologically illiterate
GoneNomad
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyd
...I wasn't aware that you could only buy LTE Android tablets from cellular providers.
It's not quite "only," but close. The main difference is, Apple makes and sells LTE iPads that support many different LTE frequency bands, in order to work with more than one carrier (but not all), whereas Android phones & tablets are mostly carrier-specific, and each carrier (and their dealers) sells its own version, with customized software already installed (e.g.: boot screen says "AT&T" etc.), and they typically may not work with other carriers (although newer tablets are tending to support more LTE bands than in the past, making them compatible with more carriers... to an extent. Some small-time (but legit) cellular dealers sell on ebay and Amazon.

For example, the LG GPad X 8.0 V520 is an AT&T-specific version. T-Mobile's version is the V521, but that one has only 16GB of storage (vs. 32GB for the V520). In this case the V521 doesn't support any add'l. bands than the V520, but that's not the case for the newer T-Mobile-specific LG G Pad II 8.0 V530, which supports one of T-Mo's newer LTE bands (66) that the V520 does not support. Support for the newest bands usually doesn't matter unless you end up in a more remote area (or deep inside a building)... where service was recently provided using one of the newest longer-ranged bands.
GoneNomad
Quote:
Originally Posted by ron4adams
All of you guys are great, but now I can understand how my students who had significant deficiencies in basic algebra felt when I tried to teach them Calculus. After all your attention I must report that I got a thumbs down on using a tablet for our navigation from my navigator. She is used to implementing our pre planned trip with our old Tomtom...
FWIW, TomTom does have a nav app for both Android and iOS. It's free for up to 50 miles/month; after that the pricing is subscription-based. It's UI is almost the same as recently-produced TomTom PNDs. I have tested this app several times... and the best I can say for it is, I guess it's OK, but it leaves a lot to be desired, starting with the low-contrast UI.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ron4adams
...will probably purchase a new tomtom so that at least we have updated maps. Which maps we use at home to plan our trips is to be decided, but I guess I will be spending my non-travel days entering many many many destinations into my new tomtom one at a time.
TomTom has a trip planning website that allows routes to be automatically synched (via Wi-Fi) with the TomTom mobile app or any compatible TomTom PND. Just to make things more confusing, TomTom tends to refer to the mobile app as "MyDrive" but the app is still actually called TomTom "Go", as are their PNDs that are compatible with "MyDrive": GO 52 & GO 62 (along with the trucker versions). All of these may be dependent upon a smartphone's data connection for traffic info, unlike the more basic models that (evidently) use traffic data radio receivers. FWIW, TomTom's largest unit (6 inch) has only 800 x 480 res display, which is pretty low by modern standards.

TomTom's scheme may actually be the only commonly available one (aside from Garmin's basecamp & PND combo) that preserves user's route modifications ("via" waypoints) in the route that the nav app/PND actually uses. Most others (e.g.: google maps) lose any manual route alterations when the route is transferred to a phone.
...
Ken in Regina
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken in Regina
Try this to see if it helps with transferring your POIs.

...ken...
Damn, I should know better than to do this on my phone while waiting for car repairs... Here are a couple of TomTom support links about moving POIs between TomTom units.

http://uk.support.tomtom.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/24851/~/transferring-pois-from-one-na...on-device-to-another

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AiO4zR0ugGo

...ken...
Ken in Regina
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoneNomad
It's not quite "only," but close. The main difference is, Apple makes and sells LTE iPads that support many different LTE frequency bands, in order to work with more than one carrier (but not all), whereas Android phones & tablets are mostly carrier-specific, and each carrier (and their dealers) sells its own version, with customized software already installed (e.g.: boot screen says "AT&T" etc.), and they typically may not work with other carriers (although newer tablets are tending to support more LTE bands than in the past, making them compatible with more carriers... to an extent. Some small-time (but legit) cellular dealers sell on ebay and Amazon. .....
Is it really that bad in the Excited States? Up here north of the 49th you can easily buy phones that are not carrier specific. And the device's coverage of the various bands will usually allow me to get at least one, usually more, of the bands on my carrier of choice. It's exceedingly rare to see a phone or tablet with a radio that doesn't cover nearly the entire spectrum.

In addition to buying unlocked phones and tablets, there is even legislation requiring that I can request the unlocking of a carrier-locked phone after some minimum time (1 year??).

If I buy a phone or LTE tablet from some place like Best Buy I usually have a selection of the major carriers in the serving area to choose from when I buy it. Or no carrier at all if I don't want a SIM yet (not unusual for tablets which are often bought because the LTE version has features that the non-LTE version does not but have no relation to, or requirement for, cell service).

And even a small city like Regina, Saskatchewan, will typically have all or most of the big guys and a couple or three of the smaller ones to choose from.

Sounds like down there it's bad. And getting worse.

...ken...
Ken in Regina
Here are the coverage specs for my current phone (OnePlus 6). This is typical.

LTE/LTE/A:

DL 4CA/256QAM, UL CA/64QAM, 4x4 MIMO
Supports up to DL CAT16/ UL CAT13 (1Gbps/150 Mbps) depending on carrier support

Bands

FDD LTE: Band 1/2/3/4/5/7/8/12/17/18/19/20/25/26/28/29/30/32/66/71
TDD LTE: Band 34/38/39/40/41
TD-SCDMA: Band 34/39
UMTS(WCDMA): Band 1/2/4/5/8/9/19
CDMA: BC0/BC1
GSM: 850/900/1800/1900 MHz

...ken...
GoneNomad
That phone you mentioned (One Plus 6) is a brand new, sort of an oddball phone, that I'd never heard of before... but now that you mentioned it, it is available in the US, and does work with several carriers. Looks like a good value compared to some more well-known phones, but it's still nearly $700 on Amazon, and sold by a 3rd-party seller, which sometimes mean they are reselling phones that came from cellular service dealers.

UPDATE: I see that it's apparently less expensive directly from ONEPLUS.
Looks like a great deal for somebody who wants that type of phone.
As for me, I prefer the much smaller dumbphone for calls, and an 8" tablet (even larger but still one-hand-holdable) for data tasks. To each their own.

This is an example of a relatively new trend: a new brand of smartphone, that's not a basic bargain basement phone, sold directly from the manufacturer. Apple started this, and google imitated it. But most of the 'major brand' (Samsung, etc.) phones have been (and still are) typically sold & activated by cellular dealers (even if it's that carrier's kiosk in a Best Buy).

Here's an example of the progression in LTE band support over the olast three years: LG Stylo 4 vs. LG Stylo 3 Plus vs. LG Stylus 2 Plus The newest Stylo supports a lot more bands than older iterations in this series. FWIW, the latest Stylo 4 costs about $200 or less.

As an example of the recent past (in tablets, anyway), older to newer:

LG G Pad F 8.0 T-Mobile V496: LTE Bands 2/4/12

LG G Pad F 8.0 (2nd Gen): LTE Bands 2/4/5/12/13/17/25

LG G Pad X 8.0 AT & T V520: LTE Bands 1/2/3/4/5/7/12/29/30
LG G Pad X 8.0 T-Mobile V521: LTE Bands 2/3/4/7/12

LG G Pad X II 8.0 PLUS T-Mobile V530: LTE: 2/4/5/12/66, LTE Roaming: 1/3/7/20

Since the V520 supports every T-Mobile band that the V521 supports, there is *no* reason to buy one of these, especially considering that it has only 16GB storage compared to the V520's 32GB.

The newer V530 (which has a very, very slightly faster CPU) supports band 66 that T-Mo rolled out in a few areas, but most of T-Mo's new service in rural areas is on an even newer band (71). Also, the V530 doesn't have an internal full-size USB "A" port like the older V520/V521 (V530 uses an add-on battery 'backpack' for the full-size USB "A" port)

...
Boyd
Quote:
Originally Posted by ron4adams
so will probably purchase a new tomtom so that at least we have updated maps.
From what you said, it sounds like you have an older TomTom device. If you get a new one, there is probably going to be a learning curve there too. You might want to play around with some in a store (if you can find any). I have not used a dedicated TomTom since I sold my GO 920 many years ago. But my assumption is that the TomTom GoMobile app is very similar to the new ones. So if you wife is going to have to learn something new anyway, a tablet would give you more flexibility since it could be used for other apps as well as TomTom.

It's a free app and is available on both iOS and Android, so you might check that out on your existing phone for starters.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tomtom.gplay.navapp&hl=en_US
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/tomtom-go-mobile/id884963367?mt=8
GoneNomad
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyd
...If you get a new [TomTom], there is probably going to be a learning curve there too...my assumption is that the TomTom GoMobile app is very similar to the new ones.
Yep. The mobile app's UI is very similar to the UI on current TomTom PNDs.
ron4adams
I am still shopping and would appreciate any input on the Simbans TangoTab 10 Inch Tablet? I have discovered am cup holder mount that would accommodate a 10 inch device so am back to looking at tablets.
Boyd
No experience with that. But I am just naturally skeptical about the quality of a 10" tablet that only costs $150.
GoneNomad
A brand I never heard of with a 10.1" 1280x800 display?

I'd pass.
Ken in Regina
I checked some of the reviews on Amazon and the poor reviews are unanimous that their support is nearly nonexistent. So it sounds like its about as good as you might expect for the price but cross your fingers and hope it all works.

Does it have a GPS in it? If not you could be headed for trouble. Trying to get an Android app to accept input from an external GPS is a hit and miss proposition; mostly miss and not much hit.

...ken...
ron4adams
I take you advise as gospel. Now looking (again) at the Samsung 8 in Tab A. Claims to have sim card slot, wifi ready, bluetooth, and GPS. Tech services assured me that with the proper apps loaded (navigation and maps) this will navigate without internet connected and without an activated sim card. Still researching to see if the turn-by-turn voice can be delivered to my sound systems speakers (yes that system has blluetooth which works well with my phone).
GoneNomad
If you're going with an 8 inch tablet, I say again:
you can't beat the value of the LG GPad X 8.0 V520
https://www.amazon.com/d/Tablets/LG-PAD-8-0-V520-UNLOCKED/B01LGP9WJ2
or
https://www.ebay.com/itm/New-LG-G-Pad-X-8-0-V520-32GB-Wi-Fi-4G-LTE-Cellular-GSM-Unlocked-8-Tablet/173416187818


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