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12 volt charger
ron4adams
I know this question has been addressed in previous posts, but I can't find any so will ask as a new thread. Can I use any 12 volt charger for my LG Gpad? I have one that has the appropriate mini usb that I have used on my smart phone.
tcassidy
Do you mean a device that plugs into a car cigarette lighter socket and provides an output connection, either for a USB cord or a USB, micro USB or USB-C connector. Then yes. It will provide 5 volts out suitable for a device that accepts that connection. The speed at which it charges your device will depend on the adaptor's current rating.

Terry
ron4adams
Thanks, that is what I thought. Just didn't want to do any damage to my tablet.
GoneNomad
Quote:
Originally Posted by ron4adams
I know this question has been addressed in previous posts, but I can't find any so will ask as a new thread. Can I use any 12 volt charger for my LG Gpad? I have one that has the appropriate mini usb that I have used on my smart phone.
It's almost certainly a micro-USB
The only difference between an Android tablet (e.g.: V520) and a phone is that a charger intended for a phone may not put out as much power. Most of them put out around 1 amp but a charger for a larger phone may output more than that.

You can compare the OEM 120vAC wall chargers (phone vs tablet) to find out for sure.

Attached is a closeup photo of an LG V520 OEM charger, which shows it puts out 5 volts, 1.8 amps.

A charger with lower amperage output may not recharge as fast, or if it's too low (i.e.: 0.5 amp), may not charge at all if the tablet is busy doing something like navigation.

I'm not sure if which type of car charger you have, but if you use this type of 12v power to 5v USB adapters, you can use whatever charging cable is most convenient.

Just be sure to not use an generic USB cable (the type that can be used for data OR charging), because they are usually limited to only 0.5 amp charging.

This ebay seller has the best selection of charging cables I have found anywhere, including left-angled & right-angled charging cables (up to 3m long), and coiled charging cables.
Attached Images
lg-v520-charger.jpg  
tcassidy
GoneNomad makes a good point about current supply. The tablet will use more power than a phone and the charging rate may not be enough to actually overcome the power needed while using the tablet. Generally though you will see that when trying to charge while using the tablet. Not harmful but not helpful either.

Terry
Boyd
With my iPad running some audio software with the screen at full brightness, bluetooth and cellular connected, a 12 watt Apple charger takes a very long time to actually increase the battery level. I am actually lucky, because Apple is also shipping the same iPad now with only a 10 watt charger. I also have one of the 10 watt chargers, and it barely keeps up in the same usage.

Running a GPS app in the vehicle with a cellular connection and full brightness screen is also going to use a lot of power, my iPhone (with a 5.5" screen) on full brightness barely charges in the car like this. IIRC, the last time I used it on a 4 hour trip to my daugher's, the battery level only increased a few percent.
Ken in Regina
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyd
With my iPad running some audio software with the screen at full brightness, bluetooth and cellular connected, a 12 watt Apple charger takes a very long time to actually increase the battery level. I am actually lucky, because Apple is also shipping the same iPad now with only a 10 watt charger. I also have one of the 10 watt chargers, and it barely keeps up in the same usage.

Running a GPS app in the vehicle with a cellular connection and full brightness screen is also going to use a lot of power, my iPhone (with a 5.5" screen) on full brightness barely charges in the car like this. IIRC, the last time I used it on a 4 hour trip to my daugher's, the battery level only increased a few percent.
Hi Boyd,

I'm not trying to be facetious but the upside is that you can use it in that mode for an extended period without draining the battery.

There are a variety of 12V-to-USB devices out there with a range of current outputs (xxAmps @ 5V). If the one you have handy is a little under-powered you can check at places like BestBuy, Staples, The Source, or local electronics, computer, or phone stores for something with a higher Amp output rating.

...ken...
Boyd
Sure Ken, plugging it in will give a longer run time than just using the battery, regardless of the charger. But as Terry said, the battery level may still steadily go down if the charger doesn't supply enough current.

The charger I'm using came from Best Buy, and it was the highest capacity of any they had on display in the phone dept (maybe they had bigger ones somewhere else in the store?). It is rated at 2.4 amps.

But this is kind of funny, I never looked closely at it until this thread got me thinking. It has two USB sockets and according to the specs printed on the device, output #1 is rated at 1 amp and output #2 is rated at 2.4 amps. The crazy thing is, the outputs aren't labelled, so there's no way to tell which has the higher capacity!

Now I suspect I was using the 1 amp socket which is why my phone doesn't charge much while in use.
Ken in Regina
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyd
Sure Ken, plugging it in will give a longer run time than just using the battery, regardless of the charger. But as Terry said, the battery level may still steadily go down if the charger doesn't supply enough current.
Of course that's possible. I was only referring to your specific example.

Quote:
But this is kind of funny, I never looked closely at it until this thread got me thinking. It has two USB sockets and according to the specs printed on the device, output #1 is rated at 1 amp and output #2 is rated at 2.4 amps. The crazy thing is, the outputs aren't labelled, so there's no way to tell which has the higher capacity! .
I have a couple like that. One is labeled; the other isn't. The one that isn't lives in a "spares" box downstairs.

Quote:
Now I suspect I was using the 1 amp socket which is why my phone doesn't charge much while in use.
It would be great if it's that simple!

...ken...
GoneNomad
Here's a car power to USB charging adapter with a built-in display that shows the output voltage and amperage. Looks like a lot of others with this feature are available now.

In the past, a separate device like the "USB Charger Doctor" was required to measure the power output of any given charger (or charging cable).
Ken in Regina
Thanks. Those both look interesting.

...ken...
GoneNomad
Since USB cables all look practically alike, in the past I've used these 'USB charging meters' to determine which cables were charging-only cables (capable of charging as fast as the charger & device will accept), which cables are the universal type (data & 0.5 amp charging), and which cables just didn't work reliably at all.

The larger one in the photo below is like this one on Amazon.
It measures total milliAmp-Hrs too.
..
Attached Images
usb-meters.jpg  
Ken in Regina
It would seem that there are a third type, then. The cables that came with both of my Nexus phones and my OnePlus phone must be "universal+" in the sense that they do data but they also allow the phones to fast charge. My OnePlus charges in hardly any time at all when it's connected to the proper kind of charger but its cable also lets me connect it to the computer for file exchange.

...ken...
GoneNomad
Yeah, on newer phones that support the relatively new 'fast charge' standard, at least one iteration of which charges at a lot more than 5 volts.
Boyd
AFAIK, there is only one type of cable for iPhones and iPads.
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